African American

Google commemorates the “Silent Parade” when 10,000 African Americans protested Jim Crow Lynchings, Violence

google-doodle-100-anniversary-silent-paradeGoogle Doodle memorialized the 10,000 people march that happened a 100 years ago today, July 28th in 1917 that set off a history of civil rights protests and marches that later gave way to civil disobedience. The NAACP in their acknowledgement of the anniversary pointed out that protest takes many forms.

The march was organized by the NAACP and included NAACP leaders W. E. B. DuBois and James Weldon Johnson. Referred to as the “Negro Silent Protest Parade,” the march along 5th Avenue in New York was prompted by the race riots in East Saint Louis during which a 100 Black people were murdered by white mobs with 6000 others being burned out of their homes.

During the East Saint Louis riots which lasted two days starting July 2nd 1917, white mobs went after Black residents of East Saint Louis, indiscriminately stabbing, beating and lynching Black people. This had been spurred on by weeks of tension over the use of Black workers to replace striking white workers at a Saint Louis factory according to the non profit National Humanities Center, an organization which worked to collect information about the tragedy.

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